QueTwo's Blog

thouoghts on telecommunications, programming, education and technology

Monthly Archives: February 2012

Compiling the Apache Flex SDK with IntelliJ

I’ve only been using IntelliJ for a few weeks now, but I love it.  I see myself using this as my primary IDE for all things Apache Flex as time moves forward.

One question that has been asked quite frequently on the Apache Flex Dev mailing list is “How do I compile the Apache Flex SDK with IntelliJ?”  Well, since a picture is worth a thousand words, a video on the subject must be worth… umm.. (11 minute video, at 15 frames a second, times the value of pi… )  9,900,000 words!

Compiling Apache Flex SDK with IntellIJ

  1. Grab the Requirements :
    1. Java JDK 1.5, 1.6 or 1.7
    2. Adobe Open Source Flex SDK 4.6 (needed for the compiler at the time of writing)
    3. IntelliJ with ANT, Flex and Java plugins
  2. Create a new Project
  3. Create a new Java Module.  Name it anything you wish.
  4. Create a new Flex Module within that last Module.  It must be named “frameworks”
  5. Unzip the contents of the Open-Source Flex SDK into your Java Module EXCEPT the frameworks directory.
  6. Check the frameworks directory from the Apache SVN (https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator/flex/trunk) .  Make sure it ends up in the frameworks directory.
  7. Load up the ANT tab, and add the /frameworks/build_framework.xml  file.
  8. Hit the “Run” icon to start the compile.
  9. Drink a beer, or take a shower — depending on what the clock says.

After about 7 minutes or so (my computer compiles it all in 422 seconds on average), you should have a successful build, and a custom-compiled SDK!

NOTE:  The reason why we created two modules is so that you can create your own branch (or switch to somebody else’s branch) without having a whole lot of heart-ache.  All you would need to do is go to the framework module and change the branch you are checking out from.  This will allow you to create patches and submit them into JIRA against the current “patches” branch, instead of the trunk.

Microsoft Kinect and Adobe AIR

This past weekend I had the pleasure of working with the Michigan Historical Museum for their celebration of Michigan’s 175th Birthday.  I was asked to do a display involving the Microsoft Kinect, to showcase some of the possibilities of the technology.  I introduced the patrons to demos of my Kinect Space Invaders game in addition to the “dancing stick figures” demo.  Both demos were a huge hit, with the dancing stick figures drawing people in and the space invaders game showcasing a no-touch game that is highly interactive.

For both demos, I used the new as3NUI AIR Native Extension that is available here : http://www.as3nui.com/   Unlike my other Kinect projects I’ve worked with, this is the first that has taken advantage of the Microsoft Kinect SDK.  It was a huge relief to find out how easy it was for Microsoft’s SDK to install (the only thing that tripped me up was the .NET Runtime version that I didn’t have installed).  The ANE plugged right into it and fired up without issues, which was a huge relief considering how much of a pain in the rear that the PrimeSense NUI tooling to get setup.

Microsoft has finally released their 1.0 version of the Kinect for Windows SDK as of today (Feb 1st).  You can find out more about their SDK here : http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/kinectforwindows/.  Unlike the earlier, beta SDKs, they are finally allowing the Kinect to be used for commercial applications HOWEVER, you will need to buy and use one of their non-subsidized Kinect units for about $250.  No word yet if they will have re-furbished packaging like they do for the XBOX 360 Kinect units.  Developers can still use the XBOX Kinect for the time being, but Microsoft is highly encouraging for us to purchase the Kinect for Windows units vs. the XBOX ones.  It is still be be seen how driver compatibility is between the two units.

If you have any interest in checking out the Kinect Space Invaders game that I demoed this past weekend, you can install the Microsoft Kinect SDK (this was tested with Beta 2), plug in your Kinect, and install the demo from here.    I will eventually be publishing an updated version tested with the final SDK, but I will be waiting for the updated AS3NUI ANE that is being built to support the latest features of the SDK.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 27 other followers